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, there are lots of questions, one of which includes how police are handling this case. thelma gutierrez joins us live. was this a cult? what's going on here? >> reporter: don, obviously, there's some kind of a disconnect between the stories that the spouses told investigators and what now the women are telling investigators. so, we're not exactly sure exactly how this thing is going to come out, but i can tell you that they belong to a church here in palmdale. these women say that they just broke off from the church. they went off on these little prayer sessions that they would organize on their own. they routinely would come out to the desert and pray overnight and so, something happened, don, that made the husbands go into authorities and say, we're very concerned. authorities look through some of the belongings that these women left behind, cell phones, apparently letters that were interpreted as good-bye notes, and they wanted to know, were these children, eight children and five women, in any kind of danger. so, they said they wanted to err on the side of caution and so, they started this h
this story and joins us now boy phone. thelma, what more have we learned about this church group? >> reporter: fred, i can tell you that one of the women is being questioned by detectives right now about the nature of this group were they in fact, a cult or did they breakaway from a more traditional church to form their own prayer group. here is what we know. the sheriff's department told us it was an absolutely great sunday, he said everyone is okay, no crimes have been committed, despite the fact that there was a huge national manhunt taking place for the five women and eight children and fred, the way that it came to the attention of authorities that they were finding is that apparently, there was somebody here at the park, they recognized the cars and they saw this group of 13 sitting under a tree, on the grass, praying. they immediately called authorities, authorities came out to this park and found that they were fine. and you could imagine, as we roll in, the press, all the sheriff cars, the look of surprise on the faces of this group of people who are sitting on the grass praying. unb
months ago this week, a top to bottom overhaul of u.s. health care, an overhaul that presidents dating back to teddy roosevelt have contemplated, debated, or attempted. six months ago, it was sign into law by president obama. today as you may have seen live here on cnn, the president talking about provisions of that law that come into force this week. this is the first of that health care bill. it's what the white house calls a patients' bill of rights. he's just about the only democrat who is going to use health and reform in the same sentence because the reason has to do with the calendar. we're 40 days away from the elections where every single house seat and 37 senate seats are up for grabs. voters are split to say the least. 40% of americans favor reform, 56% oppose it. there are some tricks to that poll because the 56% oppose, some oppose because it didn't go far enough. most say it's too liberal, but a sizable chunk says it doesn't go far enough. when we ask which party can handle the issue better, it's a dead heat. all of this forms a backdrop to the president's visit to a fami
. >>> hello, everyone. it's the top ofth the hour. thanks for joining us. there is new questions tonight about the gas main that exploded this week in california. cnn has obtained documents showing as farck back as 2007 t utility pg&e considered a portion of the main that ruptured to have a high risk of tsilure. the first residents were escorted home to see thedamage. four people were killed. six are still missing. ted rollins joins us with the latest on that. imagine seeingthat up close ande ersonal, what once were your possessions. >> reporter: absolutely, don. we went with a couple that went baa to their home. their house is just two houses d away from area of destroyed homes. on saw the images television. they were speechless on their balcony looking over the sheer devastation of what used to be their neighborhood. pretty emotional day up there. >> just looking at all this. i -- i saw this from the news. but being here and the first time coming up here and looking at all this, it was just there's no words. i can't really explain. >> and residents who lost thr homes, don, we should tell yo
a news conference with details about what he's going to do to get the country again. tell us about the numbers in the latest polls because they're certainly not good for the president and his party. >> reporter: when we take those numbers and break them down, check this out. from the cnn opinion research corporation, a national survey, 44% of people we requested said the commission conditions right now are very poor and that is is a jump, tom, of 7 points from july. those are troubles numbers. why? because the economy, jobs, number one issue by far, with americans. you talk about the president wednesday in hoimt, there's going to be policy there but also politics at play. ohio, a state where democrats are trying to hold onto the governor ship and a bunch of house seats. >> who are they blaming? it's not like the republicans are getting a pass. they're just not the party in charge. >> reporter: right, the democrats whole the white house, they control congress. in our brand-new poll we asked, who do you blame right now? who is most responsible for the current commission conditions an
'm suzanne malvo. join us weekdays in the "situation room" from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. eastern and this time every weekend on cnn international. the news continues next on c nchcnn. >>> where is the self-professed mastermind of 9/11? are we any closer to capturing him? the owhere abouts of osama bin laden. >>> their homes blew up around them shattering lives and possessions. they're looking for answers an i don't, the death toll could rise from the devastating gas explosion in california. the neighborhood that looks like a war zone. >>> and the city of juarez, mexico, is a real war zone and the children are not immune. the drastic measures to keep children alive in the murder capital of the world. >>> good evening. i'm 9/11. nine years later at ground zero in new york, at the pentagon and atie a quiet field in pennsylvania, solemn ceremonies marked the day hijackers took control of four airlines and took aim at america'sd politic and financial capitals. the nation has changed in so many ways. some changes obvious and others, more subtle. today's speakers reminded all of us of what hadn't changed
this. we all knew that it would take more time than any of us want to dig ourselves out of this hole, created by this economic crisis. >> reporter: absolutely, jim. you know, speaking to different audiences as well. you saw there in milwaukee, labor day crowd, union folks, he was trying to rally the democratic base. get them enthusiastic about this midterm election. so far we have seen a lot more energy and enthusiasm on the republican side. on the other hand, you have republican and independent voters who have expressed a lot of concern about all of the federal spending here in washington. as you add up that tab, to $350 billion, in new programs, bottom line is that there's not going to be a second stimulus plan. they know that's fraught with all kinds of political danger. number one. people concerned about spending. number two, the fact that the first stimulus is a political dirty word now. very controversial. republicans have said it didn't work. democrats say it worked. maybe not as quickly as some wanted. bottom line, they don't want to call eight second stimulus. when you add t
could extend 90 miles from the center. you'll look at that, chad's going to go that with us and explain why it's a dangerous storm. the issue is how fast it's moving. it's contained and it's organized. reynolds is going to tell us about that, not chad. here's a live look from kitty hawk on the state's outer banks. this is the area most likely to be affected. it's also in dare county, where officials are expanded a mandatory evacuation order. >> what we need to happen now is for the visitors to heed the warning to evacuate. ? going to be an overnight storm. which always makes it difficult, because, because it's nighttime. >> while many people are leaving, others are planning to ride out the storm. they're boarding up their homes and businesses. some folks have been stocking up on groceries. one of the fastest-selling items -- water. the high demand is leaving behind some empty shelves, so anyone who is in the path of the hurricane, start planning now. airlines also taking action, air tran, frontier, delta, continental, waiving scheduling fees for rescheduling flights. reynolds wolf as i
[ ringing bell ] . >> the great poet, langston hughes, told us to hold fast to dreams for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly. hold fast to dreams, for when dreams go, life is a barren field fren with snow. >> my name is neal ofpettitte, brother of new york city police officer glen pettitte, who perished in the south tower. glen had many accomplishments in his short life. he was a volunteer fireman, an avid photographer and videographer and many accomplishments. glen's true love was being a police officer with his camera on his shoulder, he truly enjoyed helping others and giving back to his community. let's not remember his life by his accomplishments but remember him for who he really was, the memory that he left in our hearts. what our family will always remember about glen was his bright blue eyes, his big irish smile and his practical jokes. we will never forget the sacrifice you made that day. we are your brothers from lakeland fire departments, ron conkima. firefighters peter brennan, billy mahoney, james amato, lieutenant jonna napolitano and larry st
of tea. yesterday's elections in seven states and the district of columbia gave us the biggest day in politics we'll see until the actual november midterms. here are the big winners. in delaware, starting things off, this tiny state making big headlines. the tea party darling, christine o'donnell, captures the republican senate race. new york city, democratic senator char rangel easily fends off the right to seek a 21st term. a big deal, expected to win, but remember he's awaiting an ethics trial back in washington, d.c. also in washington, d.c., the city council chairman vincent gray upset the city mayor, adrian fent any a democratic may oral race and paladino, millionaire from buffalo scores defeating the candidate in the new york republican race for governor. the delaware race, the marquise matchup. tiny state but making big headlines. o'donnell backed pie the tea party and sarah palin's blessen easily turned away a nine-term delaware congressman mike castle for the right to seek the senate's seat job joe biden held for some 36 year. republican leaders until a short time ago see
. the itinerary did not change. atika shubert will join us this hour live from london. >>> new york city is reeling from a killer storm that seemed to pop out just out of nowhere. slamming the city in the afternoon rush hour. tornado-like winds actually blasted neighborhoods at 80 miles per hour ripping roofs off homes and snapping trees. one woman died when a tree crashed down on to her car and the storm dumped debris on train tracks snarling mass transit, knocked out power to tens of thousands of people. the sky is black except for those intense lightning strikes. national weather service did not declare a tornado officially but new yorkers say they know what they saw. >> it was like a twister. a whirlwind. i just couldn't even get out of the house. it was very dark and fast and a lot of power. a lot of power. >> you think it might have been a toshd? >> i think it was a tornado, yes. >> a possible tornado also slammed parts of ohio leaving a trail of splintered trees, blown out windows and overturned cars. people in wooster say they saw a funnel cloud near ohio state campus. many damag
. our karl penhaul is on this story for us, live for us in chile right now. karl, ebbs plain that part. yes, this is a breakthrough, but this doesn't mean we'll see them out of the hole any time too soon. >> reporter: exactly. let me put it in perspective, tj. first of all, a few moments ago, we talked to members of the rescue team working on the so-called plan b that mae made contact with the miners this morning, about two-and-a-half hours ago now. these two guys that we spoke to are from pennsylvania, who sent a rock drilling company -- they're the ones who have provided the drill bit down there. they say they're exhilarated by having reached the workshop close to where the miners are. they also say they're exhausted. but then from what he have explained -- i want to put it in a little perspective to you. that drill, the plan b drill, started drilling about two weeks ago. and it was going down something like this. there was already a bore hole in place, a four-inch bore hole. that's what a four-inch bore hole looks like, and the new drill was using that as a guide hole. what has happ
. thanks for joining us. 9/11 nine years vilater. here is the view in new york city right now at this moment. the familiar tribute in light snell synonymous with ground zero, symbolizing the fall in towers of the world trade center and serving as a silent reminder of the nearlypeople who died in the terror attacks. earlier in new york at the pentagon and at a quiet field in pennsylvania, solemn ceremonies marked the moments when hijackers took control of four airliners and took aim at american's political and financial capitals. the nation has changed in many ways since then. some of the change is obvious. others more so. we start with this morning's gathering of families and loved ones in manhattan, clutching photos and fighting back tears. newyork fell silent at 8:46 a.m. and again at 9:03, the moments when two jets crashed into the twin towers. acre moment reminiscent of the one that dawned nine use ago. the area remembers a construction senite full of equipment and full of grand plans for a fitting memorial. >> leeann @ lehr. >> daniel thomas awfully tough. >> what has a b
today, largely because it's not very useful. the white house released the president's speech yesterday so everybody could get their head around it and read it in advance. president obama doesn't always stick to the script, but we have a general sense what he'll say. as we wait for the president to begin we're going to tell you about some of the focus points of his speech. now, joining us to talk about it, we've got good people here who know a lot about education. first of all, our cnn education contributor steve perry on the left of the screen in hartford, connecticut. with me here no new york, tony mullen, teaches at-risk students. here with me. he was the 2009 teacher of the year. national teacher of the year. cnn suzanne malveaux is with the president in philadelphia and senior correspondent ed henry at the white house. let me start with steve. steve, what's your sense of what the president is going to say and what value this is going to bring to students and, of course, not just the students across the country who will hear him but their parents and teachers, more importantly? >> w
. good evening. thanks for joining us. 9/11, nine yearshe later. here's the view in, new york city, the familiar tribute in lights synonymous with ground zero symbolizing the two fallen towers of the with world trade center and a reminder of the nearly 3,000 people who died in the terror attacks. earlier at the pentag and at a quiet field in shanksville, pennsylvania, ceremonies marked the moments when airliners took control and took aim at thefi financial capitals. the nation has changed some ways and some is obvious and some motre subtle. we start with the gatherings, clutching photos and fighting back tears. new york fell silent at 8:46 and again at 9:03, the moment when is two jets crashed into the twin towers. reminiscent of the morning that dawned nine years ago. the area is say construction site full o f equipment and grand plans for a fittingem . >> daniel thomas -- >> what has become an annual custom, the names of the 2,752 people who died at the world trade center site were read allowed and their loved ones mourn and remembered. president barack obama traveled to the pent
>>> hey, guys. well, glad you joined us today. we had a great show and back here tomorrow. meanwhile, that does it for us. let's head back down to atlanta and john. >> thanks very much, kiran. the news continues here on cnn with kyra phillips. >> so nice to have you here. >> good morning. >> we all know why. you had a chance to catch up with some old buddies you haven't seen in, what? three decades. >> been a long time. not three decades. >> what was so special for me, not only to see how excited you were to team up with them but how excited rush was to see you and coming up on stage and jam, we had to top off the show with this. ♪ >> i guess you could qualify that as geezer rock. >> you said that was, like, the highlight -- a highlight of your life. >> my musical life. there are lots of other highlights in my life, of course. >> i hope so. >> but in terms of a frustrated guitarist and had a dream, i know you wanted to be a country singer, you know, to be able to exercise that jones even for four minutes playing limelight with them on stage -- >> it is great. >> an awful
back with more information on president carter. stay with us. cnn is going to continue in a second. i want to give my 5 employees health insurance, but i just can't afford it. i have diabetes. i didn't miss a premium payment for 10 years. and i'm worried if i lose my job, i won't be able to afford insurance. when i graduated from college, i lost my health insurance. the minute i got sick, i lost my insurance. not anymore. not anymore. not anymore. america's healthcare reforms change lives for the better. to find out how it can help you, visit us at americasfairhealthcare.org it's not just fair, it's the law. [ male announcer ] at ge capital, we're out there every day with clients like jetblue -- financing their fleet, sharing our expertise, and working with people who are changing the face of business in america. after 25 years in the aviation business, i kind of feel like if you're not having fun at what you do, then you've got the wrong job. my landing was better than yours. no, it wasn't. yes, it was. was not. yes, it was. what do you think? take one of the big ones out? nah. >>> b
this battle is costing the u.s. economy tons of money. >>> plus, you know rick sanchez as the outspoken host of cnn's "rick's list" but did you know he was once an impoverished refugee? i've read his book, we'll talk about it live. >>> and an electric car that goes 307 miles an hour. i know you're not interested in going that fast on the highway any time soon. but the technology behind the buckeye bullet could help build our future cars. i'll talk about that, as well. >>> but first, defending religious freedom in this country continues to be a hot issue. there is an emergency meeting under way right now in d.c. an interfaith meeting. it is a meeting to talk about this growing islamaphobia in this country. we're bringing you that in a moment. but i want to bring you back to why this is an issue. and it all goes back to the proposed construction of a mosque and islamic center near ground zero. this is the property that's being looked at. it's called park 51. that's the project. it was an old burlington coat factory. we talk about it as being -- or some people talk about it as being at ground z
this hour. the prosecutor says they used the town as their personal piggy bank. >> new provisions of the health care law are kibing in. >>> good morning, i'm tony harris. those stories and your comments right here, right now in the cnn newsroom. >>> a mega church pastor facing a monumental legal battle. bishop eddie long, leader of a 25,000 member congregation here in atlanta denies allegations that he used his position to coerce two young men into sexual relationships when they were teenagers. >> angels were flying around my bed all night all day! >> reporter: bishop eddie long's fiery sermons have made her a revered evangelical pastor. >> eddie long offers himself up as this kind of man's man, the quintessential man. he's a successful businessman. he's a successful preacher. he has a beautiful family. he drives a fancy car. he wears customed tailored cloenls, and in some ways some would argue he's the man all women want and all men are suppose to the aspire to be. >> reporter: two young men, former church members, say bishop eddie long used his spirit chal authority to man in la
bishop long used his spiritual authority to coerce and manipulate them into destructive sexual relationships. 20-year-old maurice robinson and 21-year-old anthony flag say they met eddie long through the bishop's longfellow youth academy. >> he would use biblical stories to talk about how important it was to follow your leader and master. and let him know that the acts that he was engaged in were not necessarily meaning that he was a homosexual. >> reporter: the spokesman tells cnn he adamantly denies the allegations, the young men allege long made them his spiritual sons in a private ceremony called a covenant. >> within that covenant, it was essentially a marriage ceremony where there was a candles, exchange of jewelry. and biblical quotes given in order for anthony to know and for the bishop to tell him i will always have your back and you will always have mine. >> in the name of jesus. >> reporter: he built a spiritual empire by sheer force of personality. new birth church had 300 members some 20 years ago. today, it has more than 25,000 members. when coretta scott king die
? >> they told us nothing. i mean, i don't know how anybody cannot repair a smell like that. and not find that smell. especially going to neighborhoods -- there's other neighborhoods that have smelled the same smell, really strong. >> reporter: and for how long have you smelled this? >> for a good three weeks. >> reporter: what did they tell you to do? >> when the head came out, they said shut the door and go inside the house and that was it. and you can see, what happened. it's just ridiculous. >> reporter: now, this morning pg & e did acknowledge that they're aware of this gentleman's accusations, and they say they're poring over their records to see if they were in this neighborhood. but again, ali, still there is a search going on for potential victims here. and until that work is done, pg & e says they can't get close enough to the pipe to really analyze it. >> natural gas is infused with a smell. so the idea is that people should be able to smell it. it's not the natural smell of the gas. they put that in there so when there is a leak and people describe it, the gas company should k
to bring in professor garcia at the university of texas. professor garcia thank you for joining us. let me start out by asking you if you heard, saw anything this morning when this took place? >> good morning. actually, no i didn't see anything. we first received word across campus via a text message alert system that the university has in place and that was approximately at 8:30 this morning. shortly thereafter we started hearing the campus sirens going off and that's the moment when we knew the campus was in lockdown. will you get a text message when the campus is no longer in lockdown? >> yes. the way the system is set up, we get those alerts when it begins and end internally, those we've been receiving multiple e maim streams from people within the department, people within different safety committees, so the ut committee is fairly well informed internally of what the situation is. >> and i'm going to ask you about that situation and what those internal notifications say, because, professor, as i'm sure you know, in a case like this, you could have multiple witnesses seeing the same gu
for that news conference to begin. jim, if you would, give us a sense of the scene at this hour? >> reporter: sure, here at the command center for the fire, people are apprehensive for the weather today. yesterday a firefighters called it a gift, cool and humid. today, not so lucky. dry and a real chance winds could pick up later this afternoon. they are trying to make progress and try to contain it before it happens. several subdivisions opening to areas evacuated but not burned. the real heart of the fire, people not allowed back. people are restless but authorities don't want anybody up there until they feel it's safe. >> any word on the unaccounted for and how they will search for them? >> reporter: searching is difficult because people evacuated from the canyons, staying with friends and families, staying in hotels and around the evacuated area. they are optimistic that nobody has actually been hurt and people have gone off with family and haven't checked in but it's going to be difficult. these houses that have burned, it's just the foundation that's left. >> give us a heads up when th
's the first time i've ever enjoyed the u.s. open in tennis. >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn. >> they're going to start this on golf now. >> reporter: new york. >> all right. that does it for us. see you back here tomorrow. t.j. holmes in for tony harris today? >> hey there, thank you so much. they serve a lot of liquor i think at the u.s. open. all right. kyra, we'll talk to you again soon. we are starting anew this center live at the world headquarters in atlanta, georgia. let me tell you what we have on the rundown on thursday september, 30th. we have to start this with story out of rutgers, a freshman at the school apparently jumps to his death after a gay encounter is secretly streamed live on the internet and two classmates are now facing charges. >> i read it on-line i was like -- i was shocked. >> also, coming up, food made in a laboratory. scientists want this piggy to go to the market, but maybe then he could go straight to your dinner plate. >> what i can tell the american public no food from a genetically engineered animal will go on the market unless the fda has demonstrated -- >>
, how we relate to the world. today eegs speakers mind all of us that what will never change is america's commitment to its ideas of freedom, tolerance and human liberty. with each year ts day brings back memories for so many people. the gathering of loved ones fighting back tears and clutching photos. a clear day reminiscent of the one that dawned nine years ago, new york fell silent at the moments when two jets crashed into the twin towers. the area remains a construction site, full of equipment and full of grand plans for a fitting memorial. what has become an annual custom, the names of the 2,752 people who died at the world trade center site were read aloud and their loved ones listened and remembered. >>> outside washington, president obama joined thewd gather to honor the peop killed at the pentagon. he talked about how americans continue to respond. >> the perpetrators of this evil act didn't sply attack america. they attacked the very ideal o america itself. all that we stand for and represent in the world. so the highest honor we can pay those we lost, ineed, our greatest wea
would we do, you and i? >> great stuff with chrissie hind. >> took us both back to the '80s. >> elementary school, i was just a babe. have a great weekend. >>> live from studio 7 at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta, i'm don lemon. >>> banged up new yorkers have some cleaning up to do. a freak but fast storm rolls over the city with very destructive force. >>> the government revoking a breast cancer drug. studies question whether it works. >> i couldn't say that avastin is the reason i lived longer than i expected. i say it's a combination of a lot of things. >>> mens forced to work in factories and mines under brutal conditions. american p.o.w.s return to japan looking for an apology. >> our needs are simple. >> we'll update you on that story. >>> good morning, i'm don lemon. tony is off today. those stories and your comments right here, right now in the cnn newsroom. we start with this story. who is this woman? and why is she about to have a big influence over your finances? she is, of course, elizabeth warren, and today president obama appoints her to help establish t
u.s. commander in afghanistan says a florida pastor is putting u.s. troops at risk. his church is planning to burn the koran this saturday, the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. meantime, some american muslims concerned about their safety. the end of ramadan coincides with 9/11 this year, pushing fear to whole new levels in those communities. >> frankly, i have not felt this fearful. >>> a pair of tennis players raising a racket at the u.s. open quarter finals saying why can't neighbors get along. >> we can get along on the court and off the court, why can't we be friends? >> and gornlg i'm brooke baldwin, tony harris has the day off. those stories and your comments right here right now in the cnn newsroom. >>> want to begin with a dire warning about a pastor's plan to burn the koran. have you followed the story? the u.s. commander in afghanistan says this plan by this florida church would essentially put the lives of u.s. troops in danger. here's just a snippet. this morning on cnn's american morning, pastor terry jones says he is weighing the concerns from general david
started and told us we in recession before anybody else called it, with me last spring and summer when you said the recession is over. do you agree with, first of all, this? >> in april '09 we said the recession would end in the summer of '09. so we do agree with this. and we have been saying it was june or july. i totally accept the june date. why it's important is because the national bureau of economic research is an objective, using an objective methodology. we all have our feeling, we'll get to in a second, but they're use an objective scorecard for when the economy is expanding, con tragting in a recovery or recession, and it ended in june of '09. let's be clear what that means. all it means is that the economy made it into the recovery room. okay? and started a process of healing. now, anyone who a has been in that situation and made it into a recovery room knows that it still really, really, really hurts when you're in the recovery room, and we're still there. be very, very clear. that's a big part of the reason wyman on the street right now is going to say, who are these guys sayi
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28